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New book exposing NFL drama

Ann McKee who wonders if chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) — its symptoms are similar to dementia — is an unavoidable consequence of playing football.

“I’m really wondering if every single football player doesn’t have this,” she said.

Investigative journalists Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru have written a new book called, League of Denial: The NFL, Concussions, and the Battle for Truth. It already negotiated a $765 million settlement with former players and has litigation to deal with on this topic. It tells tales of intimidation, manipulation and phony science, accusing the NFL of prioritizing its business interests over player safety despite known and severe hazards to players.

The NFL isn’t talking about it. It accuses NFL commissioner Roger Goodell of hearing from independent researchers about the link between football and brain damage in 2007, but waiting three years to acknowledge it.

So that aspect of the book doesn’t break new ground, but the promotional materials for the book promise the most logistically detailed account of how the concussion narrative has been shaped over the past 20 years.

The guys that brought you the BALCO scandal are back, and they’ve opened up another big can.

League of Denial quotes a researcher named Dr.

Excepts are available here and here .

It accuses the NFL of setting up a self-serving health study that concluded concussions were minor injuries not likely to cause neurological problems later in life. The book analogizes the NFL and its approach to handling concussions to Big Tobacco and its handling of health problems caused by cigarettes. Heavy stuff. It accuses the NFL of attempting to keep secret agreement to pay more than $2 million in disability payments for former players, after deciding football had given them brain damage. It has been out in the public for a few years now that playing football often leads to brain trauma resulting in depression, anxiety and dementia, among other illnesses. And it is widely accepted that for a long time the football community was, at best, willfully ignorant of the severity of these risks.

If that’s true, it’s a big problem not just for the NFL, but for football itself.

Ebooks Vs. Paper Books: The Pros and Cons

You don’t have to kill a few trees for each book, and let’s not even talk about the ink. Not to mention scratches, dropping them, and so on.

In general, ebooks suffer from other cons as well:

They’re not readily available, and format wars are making the decision to buy a reader very difficult. Specifically, some types of content paper books are better for are:

Textbooks (or any books which are generally large-format).Picture / Photo books.

Another factor to bear in mind is that paper books don’t need power to function. Long periods spent in front of a computer are healthy for nobody.Power. Recycling only goes so far.Note-taking is much more powerful, and the notes you write can be found and referenced quickly and easily. Many readers incorporate display lighting allowing you to read whenever and wherever you like. Most readers offer zoom functions, letter resizing, and so forth.They’re easily portable. The article below is still very valid. The 2012 version gives you (as a reader) a different perspective, and a handy guide to when you should be buying an ebook reader.

The obvious cons are:

Paper books are bulky and heavy.

Depending on the type of material you’d like to read / look at, however, one does have advantages over the other.

Some types of books especially suited for a reader are:

Novels or non-fiction books without many pictures.Web-sites with html links and cross references. If you spill <insert beverage of choice> on them, chances are that’s the end of your reader. Reading Sumerian legends on clay tablets can feel more “authentic”, but doesn’t necessarily enhance your understanding of the subject matter – just your experience.

The eBook

eBooks offer the following obvious advantages (assuming you have an ebook reader):

They’re easily readable.

The disadvantages of ebooks generally stem from the hardware you’re reading them on.

eBooks are useless without a reader. Both allow you to do the most important thing – read a book. Will you go for the Amazon one, and buy books (only) there? Or the Sony?The pricing model hasn’t been worked out yet, causing some major discrepancies.

PLEASE NOTE: The 2012 addendum to this article you’ve all been asking for: Ebooks vs. There are a few on the market, such as Amazon’s Kindle, Jinke’s Hanlin reader series, Sony’s eReader series, and a few others. They can be read anywhere with sufficient light, and are perfect travelling companions for exactly this reason.. If it’s a computer, you’ve got the normal computer problems which detract from your reading pleasure:

Eye strain and RSI. Paper Books: The Pros and Cons – 2012. You can always see the imprints, even if you erase every last shred of graphite).

What Makes a Book?

In essence, the two formats are very similar. Your average laptop has 4-6 hours of battery life. And they don’t have to be permanent.Lighting conditions essentially become meaningless. Portability. These are mentioned because they incorporate a technology called e-ink, which resembles paper very closely, and eliminates most eye-strain issues.

The “Classic” Paper Book.

Paper books offer multiple advantages:

They’re easily obtainable (Bookstores are everywhere).They’re easily portable.They don’t normally cause significant eye-strain.They’re cheap.

Okay, that much was obvious. Why lug a laptop around if you can simply carry a book?

The cons of the reader devices are a little more subtle:

You still have battery life to worry about.Nasty software bugs in the reader can cause it to freeze up.They’re not very robust. The text is the important thing, not the medium. Carrying more than 2-3 around can become a chore.You need a light source to read them – another thing that you’ll probably carry around.If you make notes in them, those notes are there to stay (Yes, even pencil. You can carry multiple books on one device.They’re much more environmentally friendly